Comprehensive epilepsy treatment

At IBS hospital we have one of the most modern and comprehensive medical centers in the country and hosts many national clinical and academic programs and is continuing to add major research and academic capabilities. Our neurological and neurosurgical departments offer all the procedures and techniques necessary for a precise diagnosis as well as for precise guidance during brain surgery. At IBS we have neurosurgeons to treat neurological diseases which include head injury, spinal injury, brain tumors and spinal tumors. We have specialization in treating seizures or epilepsy as well as modern treatments for movement disorders like Parkinson's disease.

At IBS hospital we have one of the most modern and comprehensive medical centers in the country and hosts many national clinical and academic programs and is continuing to add major research and academic capabilities. Our neurological and neurosurgical departments offer all the procedures and techniques necessary for a precise diagnosis as well as for precise guidance during brain surgery. At IBS we have neurosurgeons to treat neurological diseases which include head injury, spinal injury, brain tumors and spinal tumors. We have specialization in treating seizures or epilepsy as well as modern treatments for movement disorders like Parkinson's disease.

At IBS hospital we have one of the most modern and comprehensive medical centers in the country and hosts many national clinical and academic programs and is continuing to add major research and academic capabilities. Our neurological and neurosurgical departments offer all the procedures and techniques necessary for a precise diagnosis as well as for precise guidance during brain surgery. At IBS we have neurosurgeons to treat neurological diseases which include head injury, spinal injury, brain tumors and spinal tumors. We have specialization in treating seizures or epilepsy as well as modern treatments for movement disorders like Parkinson's disease.

 

Orthopedic In case of seizure, you can take an appointment with IBS specialist medical practitioner who has an expertise in treating any type of epilepsy. This should be done within two weeks from the time of diagnosis. The diagnosis of the type of epilepsy depends upon EEG (electroencephalogram) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) conducted by the specialist. If Epilepsy is diagnosed, the specialist would classify it by the type and the syndrome. The syndrome could be defined as a group of signs and symptoms that when added together, suggest a particular medical condition. The specialist would agree a care plan with you that should look at lifestyle as well as medical issues.

Treatment

Epilepsy could be treated with epilepsy medication. Under the guidance of the specialist medication would be started. There are different medications recommended depending on the type of seizures. In some specific treatments there is ketogenic diet and surgery suggested. Ketogenic diet is a special diet for children where the management is little difficult. You should be fully involved in all discussions about the benefits and risks of your treatment. During your epilepsy the specialist would discuss the following with you:

  • diagnosis and the type of seizures you have, whether it is an epilepsy syndrome, and what the long-term outlook is
  • benefits and risks of epilepsy medicines
  • Your lifestyle and personal preferences.
  • How has epilepsy affected your life, including safety issues
All the reports are provided so that you could assess and know your condition with the specialist. The specialist would provide information that is useful to you for getting treated from epilepsy condition
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatment option
  • Risk management
  • First aid
  • Driving
  • Employment
  • Education
Reviews

You should have the regular reviews of your epilepsy and treatment. For adults, the check up has to be at least once a year. For those suffering from seizures or side-effects because of epilepsy medicines, or for a particular advice, you should see your specialist. An example would be if you are a woman planning a pregnancy, you need to discuss the treatment plan with your specialist. Children and young people should have their review with a specialist, at least once a year, but more if required. The specialist should be a doctor who treats and cares for children (a pediatrician).

Difficult to control epilepsy

At IBS hospital we offer a full range of options for the treatment of epilepsy, including monitoring with implanted electrodes, resective surgery and vagus nerve stimulation. In case when epilepsy state is not under control, we have a team of best surgeon which includes the Neurologists, GP, Neurosurgeons and Psychiatrist to treat Epilepsy.

Epilepsy and learning disabilities

Patients suffering from epilepsy and learning disabilities, should be given the same support and care for their epilepsy as everyone else. You will also need the care of the learning disabilities team.

Women

You would be given information and counseling about how epilepsy and epilepsy medicines may affect:
  • Periods
  • Contraception
  • Becoming pregnant
  • Pregnancy itself
  • Breastfeeding
  • Caring for children
  • The menopause
You would be given this information before you become sexually active, pregnant, or reach the menopause.

Emergency care

Seizures typically end on their own, yet some individuals have repeated long seizures. Maybe these seizures ought to be treated with emergency medications. They could be listed as midazolam or diazepam. On being diagnosed with seizure you should be given the information data about what to do, and whom to contact, in a crisis scenario during review session.

Surgery In Epilepsy

Epilepsy surgery is reserved for people whose seizures are not well controlled by seizure medicines. This situation is sometimes called as "medically refractory" or "drug resistant" phase. In children, the definition of medical refractory is even more individualized to the specific child's situation. Surgery may be considered for some children after weeks to months of treatment with seizure medicines.

Who may be eligible for epilepsy surgery?

Surgery is an elective procedure done in people who had undergone extensive testing to decide if they are potential candidates. The following criteria are considered whether a person may be a good candidate for surgery or not. Individuals who have failed adequate trials of two first-line seizure medicines (ones that are commonly effective in controlling the type of seizures the person is experiencing) and one combination of at least two drugs.
  • A trial of a medication is considered adequate when it has been increased gradually to the maximum dosage that does not cause serious side effects.
  • If the person has frequent seizures, any improvement will be obvious after a short time. If the seizures generally occur far apart, however, it may take months to determine whether a medication is helping.
At some epilepsy centers, patients are offered additional conventional or experimental medications before surgery is considered. But research suggests that each time a trial of medication fails to control a person's seizures, it becomes less likely that a different medicine or combination will be successful.

Since uncontrolled seizures present serious physical risks and social and psychological consequences, the trend these days is to proceed with surgery much sooner than in the past if it seems appropriate for that person.

What should a person and their family expect from epilepsy surgery?

Epilepsy surgery is a neurosurgery and the risk associated with it and there is some mild discomfort afterward. The recovery period varies for each individual. The hospital stay also varies, depending on the specific procedure performed. Most people can resume normal activities 2 to 8 weeks after the operation.

It is critical for the patient and family to have realistic expectations of the results of the surgery. Here are a few things to consider.

  • After surgery, some patients become completely seizure-free and some have no improvement at all.
  • Many people fall between these extremes, having fewer seizures or seizures that are less intense.
  • Some people may be able to lower or simplify their medicines if seizure control improves. People who become seizure free after surgery may be able to come off medications if they are seizure free for a number of years.
  • After a person has been thoroughly evaluated for surgery, the likelihood of seizure freedom and potential risks can be explained to the patient and family more specifically.
What else should a person with seizures and their family be aware of?

Strange as it may seem, becoming seizure-free after epilepsy surgery can be stressful and may require a major adjustment.

  • Seizure control may create greater pressure to be employed or to assume other responsibilities.
  • It also may change relationships and other people's expectations.
  • Some people feel depressed about these changes and they may need a great deal of support during the adjustment period.
  • One of the biggest stresses after epilepsy surgery is the occurrence of a seizure in someone who has been free of seizures for a while. The return of seizures can be psychologically devastating, but it does not mean that surgery has failed.
  • Often there may be other seizure triggers, such as missing a dose of medicine, a drop in drug levels, alcohol use, a serious illness or infection, or excessive sleep deprivation or stress. Addressing potential trigger(s) can help the person regain seizure control.
  • Sometimes medication adjustments may be helpful in controlling seizures again.
  • It's important not to give up if seizures recur. It does mean that people need to continue medications and pay attention to their lifestyle and other factors that can affect their risk for seizures.

 

 

 

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